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What is Cultural Diversity?

Cultural Diversity: Imagine All the People



What language do you speak? What is your religion? What holidays do you celebrate? What is your racial identification? What is your ethnic identity? What is your culture?

Culture is that which shapes us; it shapes our identity and influences our behavior. Culture is our “way of being,” more specifically, it refers to the shared language, beliefs, values, norms, behaviors, and material objects that are passed down from one generation to the next. [footnotes omitted]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the 2009 population in America was:
*80% White
*16% Hispanic or Latino origin (may be of any race)
*13% African American
*5% Asian
*1% American Indian/Alaskan Native
*0.2% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander [footnote omitted]

Each race encompasses a multitude of different ethnic groups. An ethnic group refers to people who are closely related to each other through characteristics such as culture, language, and religion. There are many ethnic groups in the United States, due in large part to its immigrant population; each of these groups contributes to America’s cultural heritage. From African Americans to Russian Americans, the United States is one of the most diverse nation in terms of culture.

What does it mean to be “culturally diverse”?
The term “culturally diverse” is often used interchangeably with the concept of “multiculturalism.” Multiculturalism is defined as:


“…a system of beliefs and behaviors that recognizes and respects the presence of all diverse groups in an organization or society, acknowledges and values their socio-cultural differences, and encourages and enables their continued contribution within an inclusive cultural context which empowers all within the organization or society. [footnote omitted]

Sociologist Dr. Caleb Rosado, who specializes in diversity and multiculturalism, described seven important actions involved in the definition of multiculturalism:


recognition of the abundant diversity of cultures;
respect for the differences;
acknowledging the value of different cultural expressions and contributions;
valuing what other cultures offer;
encouraging the contribution of diverse groups;
empowering people to strengthen themselves and others to achieve their maximum potential by being critical of their own biases; and
celebrating rather than just tolerating the differences in order to bring about unity through diversity.

Why is cultural diversity a “good thing”?
Culture is the lens with which we evaluate everything around us; we evaluate what is proper or improper, normal or abnormal, through our culture. If we are immersed in a culture that is unlike our own we may experience culture shock and become disoriented when we come into contact with a fundamentally different culture. People naturally use their own culture as the standard to judge other cultures; however, passing judgment could reach a level where people begin to discriminate against others whose “ways of being” are different than their own–essentially, we tend to fear that which we do not understand.

Cultural diversity is important because our country, workplaces, and schools increasingly consist of various cultural, racial. and ethnic groups. We can learn from one another, but first we must have a level of understanding about each other in order to facilitate collaboration and cooperation. Learning about other cultures helps us understand different perspectives within the world in which we live, and help dispel negative stereotypes and personal biases about different groups.

In addition, cultural diversity helps us recognize and respect “ways of being” that are not necessarily our own, so that how we interact with others we can build bridges to trust, respect, and understanding across cultures. Furthermore, this diversity makes our country [or world, rather] a more interesting place to live, as people from diverse cultures contribute language skills, new ways of thinking, new knowledge, and different experiences.

How can you support cultural diversity?
*Increase your level of understanding about other cultures by interacting with people outside of your own culture—meaningful relationships may never develop simply due to a lack of understanding.
*Avoid imposing values on others that may conflict or be inconsistent with cultures other than your own.
*When interacting with others who may not be proficient in English, recognize that their limitations in English proficiency in no way reflects their level of intellectual functioning.
*Recognize and understand that concepts within the helping profession, such as family, gender roles, spirituality, and emotional well-being, vary significantly among cultures and influence behavior.
*Within the workplace, educational settings, and/or clinical setting, advocate for the use of materials that are representative of the various cultural groups within the local community and the society in general.
*Be proactive in listening, accepting, and welcoming people and ideas that are different from your own.

Cultural diversity supports the idea that every person can make a unique and positive contribution to the larger society because of, rather than in spite of, their differences. Imagine a place where diversity is recognized and respected; various cultural ideas are acknowledged and valued; contributions from all groups are encouraged; people are empowered to achieve their full potential; and differences are celebrated

"Diversity is the one thing we have in common. 
Celebrate it every day." -Anonymous [footnote omitted]

(Typed by Author Vee Nelly. Source of Article is from a Creative | Art Class assignment I once took part in, on about the year 2017. The Author of this Article is unknown at this time.)

Knight

Véé Nelly is a self-motivated, creative author who writes to share his thoughts and experiences with the public. The mission of this website at https://knightvision.ink, is to inspire other aspiring authors to publish their writing. Genres that he is most interested in reading and writing include Horror, Crime, suspense, Thrillers, Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Eschatology, and spiritual novel. He loves a well-crafted book with twists and turns. At home, Véé Nelly is the oldest of four siblings, an uncle to three, and the father of three. As the son of a retired Army Veteran and a mother who played the role of both parents, he had a difficult childhood. Although he had been through more than most, he drew hope and optimism from his experiences and directed his feelings into writing to share with the world. Outside of reading and writing, Véé Nelly’s hobbies include playing sports, cooking, creating new dishes, deep-sea fishing, sculpting, and volunteering. With a wide range of hobbies and experiences, he is able to produce varying and unique characters with different backgrounds and lives. Some of Véé Nelly’s favorite authors include John Grisham, Anne Rice, Stephanie Meyer, Dean Koontz, Stephen King, James Patterson, and Mary Higgins Clark. Still, Nelly would say that the most significant influence in his writing comes from music rather than reading. Artists such as Joe, Room 112, Brian Mcknight, Jon B., Avant, Keith Sweat, and other R&B musicians from the 80s and 90s were his greatest inspiration. Véé Nelly has self-published two series: “Visions of Poetry” and “Visions of Truth.” The first series includes “Poetic Knight,” “Thorns and Roses,” “Midnight Rendezvous,” and the newly released collector’s edition, “Visions of Prosetry.” The Second series includes “Death Unto Life” and the collector’s edition “A King’s Fall.” Both of these series are available for purchase from our online bookstore. Véé Nelly has just released his new book, a suspense thriller titled “Dark Haze - The Island,” which is currently available. He plans to release a novel based on his life story within the near future called “Unburnt, Surviving My Enemies Flame.”

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